Stone-fruit season means cobbler season

Stone-fruit season means cobbler season

I think of late summer and early fall as stone-fruit season and that also means cobbler desserts.

As well as eating a good fill of peaches, plums and apricots over the course of their seasons, I like to make cobblers; these are Anglo-British dishes that likely first appeared in British North America before the United States existed formally.

Peach cobbler and vanilla ice cream (Photo: WREats).

Peach cobbler and vanilla ice cream (Photo: WREats).

Colonial cobblers may have been made out of necessity when ingredients to make the usual puddings were not available — instead, slowly stewed and seasoned fruit was covered with leftover crumbly and mealy ingredients like crackers, breads or biscuits. The topping of the dish was put together with bits and pieces almost like a puzzle.

One might have said that it was “cobbled together,” a process of creating that was done quickly and imperfectly, perhaps like a shoe-maker — a cobbler — working hastily. The word may also refer to cobbles — as in the cobble stone roads that we know and as the British word for “small lumps of coal.” When you look at a cobbler, you can often see that shape.

 

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